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News from Global Partnership Projects

Final report from joint climate projects: Sustainable life at home - Ecoration


The joint climate project Sustainable life at home ended late 2012 as the last of the six joint climate projects, and the final project brief, is now available. Over a six-month period, WWF and IKEA supported nine families – Ecoration families – in Kalmar, Sweden, to test out a wide variety of solutions to save energy and water and to minimise waste. The outcome clearly shows that the solutions combined with changed behaviours in fact do enable customers to live a more sustainable life at home.

The Ecoration families tried everything from modern energy-saving technologies like LED lights, to simple measures such as blocking draft with drapes and "old-fashioned" ways to cook using pressure cookers. They managed to reduce their non-recyclable waste by an average of 45 percent and their electricity consumption by about 30 percent during the project period. By the end of the project, the families’ average carbon footprint was 25 percent lower than the average in Sweden.

When WWF and IKEA started working together to tackle climate change in 2007, the partners agreed on six joint climate projects to identify barriers and develop tools and innovative solutions to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The aim was to find market transformation opportunities, identify low-carbon solutions that can contribute to reducing GHG emissions in society, and engage stakeholders throughout the IKEA value chain. This is why the projects covered a wide range of aspects, including product development, supplier operations, transportation, recycling and customer behaviour.

Read the reports from the joint climate projects and the Ecoration magazine here



 


 

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Families tested a wide variety of solutions to save energy and water and to minimise waste. 

 

After the project, the families’ average carbon footprint was 25 percent lower than the average in Sweden.

 

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